REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Originally posted on Around the World in 80 Books


By Tqwana B.

4 out of 5 stars ★★★★☆

hp script book

Little Brown UK
July 31, 2016
YA/Fantasy/Play

 

Synopsis:

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.


4 stars for nostalgia and 3 stars for story

First, some conditions of this review:

  1. It is spoiler free. I will #keepthesecrets.
  2. This is based solely on the words on the page. Plays are meant to be read aloud and performed. I’m sure it’s magical – pun intended – on stage. The stage directions have my mind spinning wondering how they pulled them off.
  3. If you read spoilers after the first previews, they are true. I wanted to not believe them b/c they seemed too on the nose as far as Albus’ Hogwarts House and such. But, then again, I though RAB being Regulus was too obvious to be true, and we see how that turned out.
  4. This is the rehearsal script, not the final one. I hear that comes out next year in a Definitive Edition. I hope that means Act III is shorter. Geez…

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is finally here! And I’m a little bit disappointed. This is probably the first Potter book I didn’t read in one sitting, and considering it’s a script and a very short read in relation, that’s saying something.

I loved being back in Harry’s world, but this read like fan fiction. Really good fan fiction, but fan fiction nonetheless. The story is in part created by Rowling, but you can tell right away, it’s not her writing. And while some of the characterizations were spot on, Harry and Hermione for example, there were others that seemed off. Ron leaned too much on the comic relief movie version than the more well-rounded but still funny version I loved in the book series. Two others from the past just didn’t feel quite right either.

The main plot involving a time-turner is pretty far-fetched and slightly ridiculous, even for a book series about witches, wizards, and magical creatures. The villain is also pretty obvious from the beginning. Again, very fan fiction-ish motivation. I’m sure I’ve read one with a similar villain.

Don’t expect a continuation of the Golden Trio’s adventures. This is firmly a story about the Potters (most of them anyway… I missed Lily and James Jrs.), which is the strength of the play and the part I loved the most. This is Harry’s story as a father and a husband, and Albus as the son who reluctantly lives in his shadow and does some very stupid things because of it. Of course, Ron and Hermione are there and even have some very adorable Ron and Hermione moments. But, Harry turns to his wife (Ginny’s great. I adore Ginny), as he should, and probably has more screen time with Draco Malfoy than Ron and Hermione combined, which is expected considering the nature of the story.

And then there’s Scorpius. I love Scorpius Malfoy! All the adoration that Draco undeservedly received, Scorpius more than earns. He’s probably worth the price of the ticket alone.

Still, this is a Potter story, a glimpse into adult Harry’s life, so I can’t dislike it. It’s what most of the fans have wanted since “all was well.” In fact, I want more. There’s still 19 years in between that we can explore. Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne still confront many of the themes we’re used to from the books, with loneliness and acceptance at the forefront. I just wish it surrounded a plot that wasn’t so outlandish.

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REVIEW: The City of Mirrors (The Passage Trilogy #3) by Justin Cronin

26891429The City of Mirrors by Justin Cronin
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

Originally posted on 80 Books Blog

ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

After the anticlimactic resolution of The Twelve (never mind all the rape), I had low-ish expectations for The City of Mirrors. Overall though, I can say I liked it.

This third installment is both a resolution and an origin story of Zero, who suffered from, of all things, a broken heart. That was probably the weakest part of the book. I expected more from the man who waited 2 decades to exact his (not so) grand plan to have a different motivation. What we’re given is a sort of Helen of Troy in Liz Macomb – the face that unknowingly launched a thousand virals, to paraphrase Marlowe. There is some irony in Zero’s hatred of his creator, Jonas Lear, for his leaving Liz to die alone. Zero’s own grand scheme means Liz waited alone in the afterlife for his arrival.

Yes, there is an afterlife, which we’ve seen before in the trilogy. Though this book is heavier on issues of spirituality, faith, and morality, especially in regards to the cost of scientific advancement. It’s why we have the virals in the first place. Maybe the book leaned too much on this message and not enough on the basic plot. Amy was still more plot device than a fully realized character. Even the final confrontation between Zero and Amy found her lacking the skills to really beat him. This was really Peter, Alicia, and Michael’s story. And Sara’s to a lesser extent.

I wavered between giving The City of Mirrors 3 stars and 4 stars, so it’s more 3.5. Despite the things I didn’t like, it is still a book that sticks with you.

View all my reviews

Currently Reading #FridayReads


By Tqwana B.

**Originally posted on Around The World in 80 Books**


Hello fellow book loving people! Happy Friday and welcome to this week’s edition of #FridayReads.

OITNB reading gifToday, I’m rec’ing my currents reads. I just received The Book of Harlan by Bernice L. McFadden, whom I have gushed about before here (more than once), from a Goodreads giveaway. I’ve also started reading The Brothers Sinister series by Courtney Milan. And by ‘started reading’, I mean consuming them all at a ridiculous pace, though I know I will hate it when I’m done and the series is over, but I can’t stop myself because they’re so good!

It just so happens that today’s #FridayReads are historical fiction. You know how those push all my happy buttons. So, check them out.


The Book of Harlan by Bernice L. McFadden – During World War II, two African American musicians are captured by the Nazis in Paris and imprisoned at the Buchenwald concentration camp.
The Book of Harlan opens with the courtship of Harlan’s parents and his 1917 birth in Macon, Georgia. After his prominent minister grandfather dies, Harlan and his parents move to Harlem, where he becomes a musician. Soon, Harlan and his best friend, trumpeter Lizard Robbins, are lured across the Atlantic Ocean to perform at a popular cabaret in the Parisian enclave of Montmartre—affectionately referred to as “The Harlem of Paris” by black American musicians.
When the City of Light falls under Nazi occupation, Harlan and Lizard are thrown into Buchenwald, the notorious concentration camp in Weimar, Germany. The experience irreparably changes the course of Harlan’s life.
Based on exhaustive research and told in McFadden’s mesmeric prose, The Book of Harlan skillfully blends the stories of McFadden’s familial ancestors with those of real and imagined characters.

The Brothers Sinister by Courtney MilanThis is the complete boxed set of Courtney Milan’s acclaimed Brothers Sinister Series – four full length books, three novellas – together, almost half a million words.
The Governess Affair
Miss Serena Barton intends to hold the petty, selfish duke who had her sacked responsible for his crimes. But the man who handles all the duke’s dirty business has been ordered to get rid of her by fair means or foul. She’ll have to prove more than his match…

The Duchess War
The last time Minerva Lane she was the center of attention, it ended badly—so badly that she changed her name to escape her scandalous past. So when a handsome duke comes to town, the last thing she wants is his attention.
But that is precisely what she gets…

A Kiss for Midwinter
Miss Lydia Charingford does her best to forget the dark secret that nearly ruined her life, hiding it beneath her smiles. But someone else knows the truth of those dark days: the sarcastic Doctor Jonas Grantham. She wants nothing to do with him…or the butterflies that take flight in her stomach every time he looks her way…

The Heiress Effect
Miss Jane Fairfield does everything wrong in society–intentionally.
Mr. Oliver Marshall does everything right. So why is it, then, that the one woman he can’t forget is the exact opposite of what he needs?

The Countess Conspiracy
Sebastian Malheur is the most dangerous sort of rake. Violet Waterfield, the widowed Countess of Cambury, on the other hand, is entirely respectable–and she’d like to stay that way. Their association would be scandalous even if someone suspected lies. But the truth about the secrets they share will bring England to its knees…

The Suffragette Scandal
A suffragette meets a scoundrel, and as scoundrels do, he lies to her, attempts to blackmail her…and falls in love with her against his better judgment. By the time he realizes that his cynical heart is hers, it’s too late. Once the woman he loves realizes how much he’s lied to her, he’ll lose her forever.

Talk Sweetly to Me
Miss Rose Sweetly is a shy, mathematically-minded shopkeeper’s daughter who dreams of the stars. When Stephen Shaughnessy, infamous advice columnist and known rake, moves next door, she knows she should avoid him. But you know what they say about the best-laid plans of mice and astronomers…